Archive for Jack Carson

C’mon In. The Technicolor’s Fine! (July, 1953)

Posted in 1950-1959, Movie Ads with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 8, 2013 by WB Kelso

 

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Dangerous When Wet finds a fit family of rubes from Arkansas dairy country getting roped into swimming the English Channel as a publicity stunt for a brand of vitamin water. It’s MGM musical logic, folks, so you kinda gotta roll with it, but, I’m telling ya it’s great fun to watch. A vehicle for Esther Williams on the surface to work her magic underwater but turns out she’s pretty great on dry land, too. And the whole thing is sufficiently buoyed by a supporting cast including Jack Carson as the pitchman, Fernando Lamas as the love interest, and William Demarest and Charlotte Greenwood as Ma and Pa (– and I love the musical number where these old fudds strut their stuff.) There’s also an extended cameo by Tom & Jerry for an amazing animated dream sequence in both content and execution that could have gone on for lot longer than it did in my opinion. Great escapist fluff, sure, but still highly recommended.

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I’d only recently become acquainted with Esther Williams’ ‘aquamusicals’ after a chance encounter with Jupiter’s Darling at about 3am five or six years ago but have been completely enchanted by her in everything I’ve seen since. Very sad to hear the news of her passing.

Esther Williams dangerous when wet

Esther Williams
(1921-2013)

Dangerous When Wet (1953) Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) / P: George Wells / D: Charles Walters / W: Dorothy Kingsley / C: Harold Rosson / E: John McSweeney Jr. / M: Albert Sendrey, George Stoll / S: Esther Williams, Fernando Lamas, Jack Carson, William Demarest, Charlotte Greenwood, Denise Darcel

For the Love of Film Noir :: Please Don’t Tell Anyone What She Did! (January, 1946)

Posted in 1940-1949, Movie Ads with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 24, 2013 by WB Kelso

 

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FTLOF - Film Noir 01Reduced Size with Titles

This post is part of my rehash and continuation of the For the Love of Film Noir Blogathon originally held back in February of 2011. Thus and so, we will be heading down the rain-soaked streets and neon-drenched back alleys of Noirville again for the entire month of March. And along with all the old material migrating over from the old site, we’ll also be scattering around a lot of new stuff as well. Also of note, we’ll be posting them in chronological order to show how the genre evolved and progressed from the 1940′s through the late ’50s. And as an added bonus, I’ll be posting some vintage adverts to stuff I’ve always associated with the genre — cigarettes, booze and fashionable ladies.

Mildred Pierce (1945) First National Pictures :: Warner Bros. Pictures / EP: Jack L. Warner / P: Jerry Wald / D: Michael Curtiz / W: Ranald MacDougall, James M. Cain (novel) / C: Ernest Haller / E: David Weisbart / M: Max Steiner / S: Joan Crawford, Jack Carson, Zachary Scott, Eve Arden, Ann Blyth, Bruce Bennett

For the Love of Film Noir :: Different? It’s Out of this World! All Set to a Torrid Tempo! (September, 1942)

Posted in 1940-1949, Movie Ads with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 10, 2013 by WB Kelso

 

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Don’t let the overly-jubilant ads fool you, Blues in the Night is like a nine-months later end result of a drunken prom date between Fritz Lang and Busby Berkeley. And for the record, folks, that’s a compliment.
 
FTLOF - Film Noir 01Reduced Size with Titles

This post is part of my rehash and continuation of the For the Love of Film Noir Blogathon originally held back in February of 2011. Thus and so, we will be heading down the rain-soaked streets and neon-drenched back alleys of Noirville again for the entire month of March. And along with all the old material migrating over from the old site, we’ll also be scattering around a lot of new stuff as well. Also of note, we’ll be posting them in chronological order to show how the genre evolved and progressed from the 1940′s through the late ’50s. And as an added bonus, I’ll be posting some vintage adverts to stuff I’ve always associated with the genre — cigarettes, booze and fashionable ladies.

Blues in the Night (1941) Warner Bros. Pictures / EP: Hal B. Wallis / P: Henry Blanke / D: Anatole Litvak / W: Robert Rossen, Edwin Gilbert (play), Elia Kazan (play) / C: Ernest Haller / E: Owen Marks / M: Heinz Roemheld / S: Priscilla Lane, Betty Field, Richard Whorf, Lloyd Nolan, Jack Carson, Wallace Ford