Archive for George Montgomery

Second Run Showcase :: 3 Smash Horror Pictures! One Complete Show! (November, 1958)

Posted in 1950-1959, Movie Ads with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2013 by WB Kelso

 
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As the 1940’s rolled into the 1950’s, The Island Theater, a much smaller venue than the Grand and Capitol show palaces, became an exclusively second run outfit, a grindhouse in the truest sense, where the turnover was an exhausting two day whirlwind of interchangeable flicks, leading to some outstanding ad combinations and campaigns that needed a proper category to show them off properly. And so, here ya go.

Entering the 3rd Dimension :: The First Epic of America! So Real You Can Reach Out and Feel it! (August, 1953)

Posted in 1950-1959, Movie Ads with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 15, 2012 by WB Kelso

 

 

 

 

 

 
A few years before he started wiring up seats and floated skeletons over audiences, Fort Ti marked director William Castle’s first foray into gimmick film-making and doesn’t cheat the audience, exploiting the stereoscopic process for all it was worth. Though technically a western, I suppose, Castle’s little adventure into the Third Dimension actually takes place during the French and Indian War, where Roger’s Rangers come to the aid of the British outpost at Fort Ticonderoga, currently on the verge of being overrun by said French and Indians. Produced by the notoriously cheap Sam Katzman, I’m surprised folks were given glasses with two lenses instead of one to cut down on costs.

Fort Ti (1953) Esskay Pictures Corporation :: Columbia Pictures / P: Sam Katzman / D: William Castle / W: Robert E. Kent / C: Lester White, Lothrop B. Worth / E: William A. Lyon / M: Ross DiMaggio / S: George Montgomery, Joan Vohs, Irving Bacon, James Seay, Phyllis Fowler

Pardon My Backfire (1953) Columbia Pictures / P: Jules White / D: Jules White / W: Felix Adler / C: Henry Freulich / E: Edwin H. Bryant / S: Moe Howard, Larry Fine, Shemp Howard, Benny Rubin, Frank Sully